Release 21 - June 2018

Foot of the Bed Cellars 2017 Santa Cruz Mountains Chardonnay

 Vineyard: Sunny Acres Vineyard in Scotts Valley

Vineyard: Sunny Acres Vineyard in Scotts Valley

Good for the earth, good for the wine
Although organizations governing the official use of wine labeling terms such as Organic and
Sustainable continue to nail down their meaning and requirements, in drought prone California,
most folks agree that using less water is a good thing. Dry farming refers to growing grapes
without irrigation. In a warm, Mediterranean climate like most of our local wine regions
experience, it is no small feat. However, by employing certain techniques in the vineyard,
farmers can grow healthy grapes that rely solely on moisture retained in the soil from the last
rainy season. This leaves little water available to dilute the grapes themselves, meaning flavors
in the resulting wines tend to be more concentrated. Most grapes grown in California are
produced with irrigation water. But, as water availability becomes more precarious, many
experts expect more vineyards to be dry-farmed. It is a win for Mother Earth, and a win for us
wine drinkers.
 

Still number one
In previous releases, we have touched on Chardonnay’s polarizing capabilities. Although the
grape is versatile in crafting a range of wine styles within the state, most people still associate
the varietal with the rich, buttery renditions that made it famous originally. While some wine
drinkers eschew these renditions in favor of lighter, more crisp wines such as those from
Sauvignon Blanc, full-bodied Chardonnay remains incredibly popular. It is so popular in fact that
Chardonnay remains California’s most grown grape variety. This version was fermented in oak
barrels that give the wine a creamy texture. Still the wine remains balanced, with refreshing
acidity coming through on the long finish.

Foot of the Bed Cellars 2014 Mendocino County Charbono

 Winemaker: Adam Webb of Odisea Wine Company

Winemaker: Adam Webb of Odisea Wine Company

What do California, the Alps, and Argentina have in common?
Charbono! Although this grape originally hails from the Savoie winegrowing region in the French
Alps, it has found new homes in the foothills of the Andes and the rolling hills of California. In
the Savoie area, they call it Corbeau, and in Argentina, it is known as Bonarda. No matter what
synonym is used, they grape is appreciated for producing wines that are medium bodied and
packed with loads of purple fruit character. The old Charbono vines responsible for this exciting
release produced a wine with notes of grilled plum, macerated blackberries, and cracked white
pepper. It is absolutely perfect for your next summer barbecue masterpiece.
 

Sold on their dream
Partners Adam Webb and Mike Kuenz worked for years in wholesale wine sales before starting
their own label with the goal of focusing on unique grapes and vineyard sites in California. Over
the course of their career, they had developed a true passion for a wide range of European
grape varieties and knew that incredible wine could be made from these somewhat obscure
varieties at home in California as well. Although its total acreage remains miniscule, Charbono has been grown in the state since the 1880’s. By working with old vineyards that give off concentrated fruit, Adam and Mike ensure that their wines from small name grapes have big
time flavors.

Martin Sheehan-Stross